The Twelve Steps

A Different view

Roger C., the author of The Little Book - A Collection of Alternative 12 Steps, has graciously given his permission to reprint selections of his book, which can be purchased HERE. Although this is not conference approved literature, we do use the interpretations listed in his book as topics for discussion. Take what you like and leave the rest! A few of our own are mixed in too.

Here's a list of the Steps.   Click on the yellow links to jump to a particular set of steps or just start from the beginning!

Agnostic aa 12 steps - A translation of the 12-steps of Alcoholics Anonymous by a group of Unitarian Univeralist Ministries interested in making the 12-steps more accessible to person of humanistic, agnostic, or atheist beliefs.

This version can be found on the AA AGNOSTICS of the San Francisco Bay Area website, which lists a number of area agnostic groups and their meeting times and locations. 

Beyond Belief AgnosticsBeyond Belief Agnostics shares some notoriety with another Toronto group, We Agnostics, for having been booted off the official AA meeting list by the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup on May 31, 2011. That event is covered in A History of Agnostic Groups in AA, found on the AA Agnostica website.

Gabe's 12 stepsInspired by his therapist, Gabe S. created this version of the steps. Gabe's version is perhaps typical of a non-believing recovering alcoholic. Part of Gabe's story is shared on the AA Agnostica website: A Higher Power of My Understanding.

We Agnostics - This version can be found on the We Agnostics website. The site states that these Steps originated in Cleveland and describes them as "training wheels" for the recovering alcoholic seeking his or her own spirituality.

Reddit.com - This was a cool set of steps we found on reddit.com/r/atheisttwelvesteppers, courtesy of u/milosaurusrex

The 12 steps of realistic recovery - Created by Mike H., January 2009, and found at his Realistic Recovery blog, Mike writes that he has chosen to see Reality as a 'Higher Power,' since it was Reality I was trying to deny and escape from with my addictions."

 12 Statements - This alternative is found on the SOS (Secular Organization for Sobriety or Save Our Selves) website. SOS does not require or use steps, but = with its free thought forum approach - any individual can use whatever addiction recovery tools he/she finds helpful.

A non-theistic translation - Martha Cleveland, a psychologist, and Arlys G., a woman in recovery, wrote The Alternative 12 Steps: A Secular Guide to Recovery in 1991. The Steps in this nontheistic "translation" are explained one chapter at a time in this pioneering book.

White bison - White Bison, Inc. uses the Medicine Wheel, a culturally appropriate recovery program for Native American people that has a single-word version of the Steps in which "each of the 12 Steps is presented from the perspective of the value that it reflects." Participants share their Step insights and experiences in a talking circle.

Single-word (virtue or principle) steps - Several single-word versions of the Steps have been organized by religious faith at Twelve Step Wisdom. These are three of eight religious versions of the 12 Steps on the website project initiated by Reverend Andrea Travers.

A Buddhist's Non-Theist 12 Steps - These Steps were created by Bodhi, from Sydney, Austrailia. They can be found on Mike H.'s Realistic Recovery website. Bodhi writes that "Buddhism does not teach the doctrine of theism, but rather points out ways to live an enlightened, spiritual life without necessarily believing in God."

Buddhist 12 Steps - Doug C.'s "A Buddhist's Insight into the 12 Steps of Recovery" was originally posted on the Buddhist Recovery Network. The network supports the use of Buddhist teachings, traditions and practices, in particular mindfulness and meditation, to help people recover from the suffering caused by addictive behaviours.

Mikey's version- The founder of Our Mostly Agnostic Group Of Drunks shares the steps he used after his "spiritual awakening".

Islamic Twelve steps to recovery - There are some 21 Millati Islami groups across the United States who use this adaptation of the Steps. Founded in Baltimore in 1989, the organization tries to "incorporate the Islamic Way of Life with the traditional Twelve Step approach."

Native american 12 steps -This version was prepared for Native Americans by the Umatilla Tribal Alcohol Program and can be found on the Young Warriors Network, a site run by a group dedicated to providing healing services to First Nations and Métis peoples in Canada

a personalized template - Neil F. descrives these Steps as "my personal process. It is what I have used to guide my recovery and day to day living." He encourages others to use it or to create their own "from the original template so that you have a process that you are comfortable with and that works for you." He explains his alternative 12 Steps on the AAAgnostica website: Personalizing the 12 Steps.

Gabe's Therapist'S Version - Gabe S. was inspired by his therapist's 12 Steps. These Steps take a psychological approach to the program of recovery from alcoholism, an approach that has been common since the first days of AA.

The Twelve step journal- From The Twelve Step Journal, a workbook designed for all in recovery regardless of belief or lack of belief, by Claudette Wassil-Grimm. Copyright ©1996 by Claudette Wassil-Grimm. Published in 1996 by the Overlook Press, New York, NY. All rights reserved.

The Twelve Steps of self-confirmation- These alternative 12 Steps are taken from Alcoholics Anonymous and the Counseling Profession: Philosophies in Conflict, an article Christine Le, Erik P. Ingvarson, and Richard C Page. It was first published in the July / August 1995 issue of The Journal of Counseling & Development

Fitting in with traditional AA by erica k.- This version of the Steps are from a popular podcast from AABeyondBelief.com.

Alan's 12 fucking steps- This version of the Steps are thrown in here at the bottom to see if anyone was really paying attention. They are here for amusement purposes only, but you may actually get something out of them.

Agnostic aa 12 steps - A translation of the 12-steps of Alcoholics Anonymous by a group of Unitarian Univeralist Ministries interested in making the 12-steps more accessible to person of humanistic, agnostic, or atheist beliefs.

This version can be found on the AA AGNOSTICS of the San Francisco Bay Area website, which lists a number of area agnostic groups and their meeting times and locations. 

 
  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol — that our lives had become unmanageable.
     

  2. Came to believe and to accept that we needed strengths beyond our awareness and resources to restore us to sanity.
     

  3. Made a decision to entrust our will and our lives to the care of the collective wisdom and resources of those who have searched before us.
     

  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
     

  5. Admitted to ourselves without reservation, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
     

  6. Were ready to accept help in letting go of all our defects of character.
     

  7. With humility and openness sought to eliminate our shortcomings.
     

  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
     

  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
     

  11. Sought through meditation to improve our spiritual awareness and our understanding of the AA way of life and to discover the power to carry out that way of life.

     

  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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Beyond Belief AgnosticsBeyond Belief Agnostics shares some notoriety with another Toronto group, We Agnostics, for having been booted off the official AA meeting list by the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup on May 31, 2011. That event is covered in A History of Agnostic Groups in AA, found on the AA Agnostica website.

 
  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol — that our lives had become unmanageable.
     

  2. Came to accept and to understand that we needed strengths beyond our awareness and resources to restore us to sanity.
     

  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the A.A. program.
     

  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
     

  5. Admitted to ourselves without reservation, and to another human being, the exact nature of our wrongs.
     

  6. Were ready to accept help in letting go of all our defects of character.
     

  7. Humbly sought to have our shortcomings removed.
     

  8. Made a list of all persona we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
     

  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong,  promptly admitted it.
     

  11. Sought through mindful inquiry and meditation to improve our spiritual awareness, seeking only knowledge of our rightful path in life and the power to carry that out.

     

  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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Humanist 12 stepsB.F. Skinner, the 1972 Humanist of the Year award winner, and a researcher and writer for Harvard University, drafted these Steps, which were first published in 1987

 
  1. We accept the fact that all our efforts to stop drinking have failed.
     

  2. We believe that we must turn elsewhere for help.
     

  3. We turn to our fellow men and women, particularly those who have struggled with the same problem.
     

  4. We have made a list of the situations in which we are most likely to drink.
     

  5. We ask our friends to help us avoid those situations.
     

  6. We are ready to accept the help they give us.
     

  7. We honestly hope they will help.
     

  8. We have made a list of the persons we have harmed and to whom we hope to make amends.
     

  9. We shall do all we can to make amends, in any way that will not cause further harm lSO.
     

  10. We will continue to make such lists and revise them as needed.
     

  11. We appreciate what our friends have done and are doing to help us.

     

  12. We, in turn, are ready to help others who may come to us in the same way.

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Gabe's 12 stepsInspired by his therapist, Gabe S. created this version of the steps. Gabe's version is perhaps typical of a non-believing recovering alcoholic. Part of Gabe's story is shared on the AA Agnostica website: A Higher Power of My Understanding.

 
  1. We admitted we could not control our drinking, nor do without it, that our lives had become unmanageable.
     

  2. We came to believe that others who had had or understood our problem could help us return to and maintain sanity.
     

  3. We decided to accept what they said and act on their suggestions.
     

  4. We made a searching inventory of our bad feelings, of those aspects of our own character that had contributed to these and of the harms we had done. We noted occasions where we had done well and were glad of these.
     

  5. We showed the inventory to at least one other person and discussed it with them.
     

  6. We accepted our moral and personal weaknesses, and accepted that they needed to change.
     

  7. We became willing to admit those weaknesses to others, where appropriate, and to heed any advice that they might offer.
     

  8. We became willing to make amends to those we had harmed.
     

  9. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it and when we had done well, recognized this.
     

  11. We adopted a practice of meditation and one of reflection upon our place in the world and how we could contribute to it.

     

  12. Having experienced a psychic change as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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We Agnostics - This version can be found on the We Agnostics website. The site states that these Steps originated in Cleveland and describes them as "training wheels" for the recovering alcoholic seeking his or her own spirituality.

 
  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol — that our lives had become unmanageable.
     

  2. Came to accept and to understand that we needed strengths beyond our awareness and resources to restore us to sanity.
     

  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the A.A. program.
     

  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
     

  5. Admitted to ourselves without reservation, and to another human being, the exact nature of our wrongs.
     

  6. Were ready to accept help in letting go of all our defects of character.
     

  7. Humbly sought to have our shortcomings removed.
     

  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
     

  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong,  promptly admitted it.
     

  11. Sought through mindful inquiry and meditation to improve our spiritual awareness, seeking only knowledge of our rightful path in life and the power to carry that out.

     

  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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Reddit.com/r/atheisttwelvesteppers - This was a cool set of steps we found on reddit.com, courtesy of u/milosaurusrex

 

Step 1: I'm in a mess and over my head. 

 

Step 2: Maybe I don't have all the answers, so I'll ask for help.

 

Step 3: Decide to pay attention to advice given.

 

Step 4: Take an honest look at how I've been living my life.

 

Step 5: Tell someone else about my unhealthy lifestyle and harm to others. 

 

Step 6: Decide to live a healthier, kinder life.

 

Step 7: Make specific changes toward that goal. 

 

Step 8: List everyone I have hurt.

 

Step 9: Have the courage to tell them I'm sorry & make amends, except if doing so                   would cause harm. 

 

Step 10: Keep an eye on myself, alert to old thinking and behaviors. 

 

Step 11: Be aware of the beauty in the world and people. 

 

Step 12: Pass on to others the kindness extended to me.

 

The 12 steps of realistic recovery - Created by Mike H., January 2009, and found at his Realistic Recovery blog, Mike writes that he has chosen to see Reality as a 'Higher Power,' since it was Reality I was trying to deny and escape from with my addictions."

 
  1. I can no longer deny I have an addiction, and admit my addiction can make me feel powerless, and that my choices and decisions while unaware or in denial of my addiction were destructive.
     

  2. I came to believe that realistic and rational thinking could restore me from the insanity of addictive thinking.
     

  3. I will let myself be helped by myself and others by using realistic and rational thinking and will never again turn my will and life over to addictive thinking.
     

  4. I will make a realistic and rational evaluation or "inventory" of my thoughts, feelings and behaviours, both positive and negative. This is not to induce guilt and shame, but to evaluate where my attitudes, actions and decisions were not realistic or rational.
     

  5. I will now admit to myself, the exact nature of my thoughts, feelings and behaviours, both positive and negative. I will share and review this evaluation with another willing person if I choose, unless where to do so would put myself or others at risk.
     

  6. I am entirely ready to allow realistic and rational thinking to reveal my destructive patterns of addictive thinking and behaviour.
     

  7. I will apply realistic and rational thinking and behaviour to replace my addictive thinking and behaviour.
     

  8. I will make a list of all persons l have harmed, or been harmed by, in a way that might have enabled my addictive thinking.
     

  9. I will take the responsibility of making amends and give the opportunity of receiving amends, except when to do so would put myself or others at risk.
     

  10. I will continue to evaluate my life, and when my thoughts, feelings and behaviours are not realistic or rational, I will promptly admit it.
     

  11. I will seek to improve my conscious awareness of reality, striving for the knowledge of what is real and rational and for the ability and determination to stop my addictive thinking and behaviour.

     

  12. Having had progress towards a realistic and rational self-awareness away from addictive thinking as a result of what I have accomplished with these principles, I shall practice these principles in all areas of my life , and will be willing to share these principles with others who think they might gain from them.

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 12 Statements - This alternative is found on the SOS (Secular Organization for Sobriety or Save Our Selves) website. SOS does not require or use steps, but = with its free thought forum approach - any individual can use whatever addiction recovery tools he/she finds helpful.

 
  1. I have a life threatening problem. My past efforts to establish sobriety have been unsuccessful. I believe that I have choices and that my life no longer need be unmanageable. I accept responsibility for myself and my recovery.
     

  2. I believe that a power within myself in tandem with supports and strengths beyond my own awareness and resources can restore me to a healthier, more balanced, and positive state of mind, body and soul. .
     

  3. I make a decision to entrust my will and life to the care of myself, the collective wisdom of those who have struggled with the same problem, and those in support of me.
     

  4. I make a searching and fearless inventory of myself, of my strengths and weaknesses. I choose not to permit problems to overwhelm me, rather to focus on personal growth and the unconditional acceptance of others and myself.
     

  5. I admit to myself, and if I choose, to another person or persons the exact nature of the negative, injurious aspects of my thinking and behavior. I explore the goodness within myself: the positive, courageous, and compassionate.
     

  6. I focus on healing, abolishing self-blame and shame, and understanding the boundaries of my responsibilities. I remain open to the help and support of others as I address the challenge of change.
     

  7. I embrace introspection and work towards alleviating my shortcomings. I strive for personal growth and fulfillment over perfection, and to become integrated with collective humanness.
     

  8. I will consider those that I have harmed and those that have harmed me. I will become willing to explore my feelings regarding those harms.
     

  9. I will make direct amends, as I deem appropriate and not injurious, to those whom I have harmed or negatively impacted and to myself.
     

  10. I will continue sincere and meaningful self-evaluation, and strive for personal betterment.
     

  11. Sought through mindful inquiry and meditation to improve our spiritual awareness, seeking only knowledge of our rightful path in life and the power to carry that out.

     

  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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A non-theistic translation - Martha Cleveland, a psychologist, and Arlys G., a woman in recovery, wrote The Alternative 12 Steps: A Secular Guide to Recovery in 1991. The Steps in this nontheistic "translation" are explained one chapter at a time in this pioneering book.

 
  1. Admit we are powerless over other people, random events and our own persistent negative behaviours, and that when we forget this, our lives become unmanageable.
     

  2. Came to believe that spiritual resources can provide power for our restoration and healing.
     

  3. Make a decision to be open to spiritual energy as we take deliberate action for change in our lives.
     

  4. Search honestly and deeply within ourselves to know the exact nature of our actions, thoughts and emotions.
     

  5. Will talk to another person about our exact nature.
     

  6. Be entirely ready to acknowledge our abiding strength and release our personal shortcomings..
     

  7. Work honestly, humbly and courageously to develop our assets and to release our personal shortcomings.
     

  8. List all people we have harmed, including ourselves, and be willing to make amends to them all. Be willing to forgive those who have harmed us.
     

  9. Whenever possible, we will carry out unconditional amends to those we have hurt, including ourselves, except when to do so would cause harm.
     

  10. Continue to monitor ourselves, to acknowledge our successes and quickly correct our lapses and errors.
     

  11. Increasingly engage spiritual energy and awareness to continue to grow in abiding strength and wisdom and in the enjoyment of life.
     

  12. Practice the principles of these Steps in all our affairs and carry the 12-Step message to others.
     

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White bison - White Bison, Inc. uses the Medicine Wheel, a culturally appropriate recovery program for Native American people that has a single-word version of the Steps in which "each of the 12 Steps is presented from the perspective of the value that it reflects." Participants share their Step insights and experiences in a talking circle.

 
  1. Honesty
     

  2. Hope
     

  3. Faith
     

  4. Courage
     

  5. Integrity
     

  6. Willingness
     

  7. Humility
     

  8. Forgiveness
     

  9. Justice
     

  10. Perseverance
     

  11. Spiritual Awakening
     

  12. Service

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Single-word (virtue or principle) steps - Several single-word versions of the Steps have been organized by religious faith at Twelve Step Wisdom. These are three of eight religious versions of the 12 Steps on the website project initiated by Reverend Andrea Travers.

 

STEP       Judeo-Christianity                              Buddhism                                   Islam

 

  1.           Powerlessness                    Suffering                               Disease
     

  2.           Belief                                 Cause of Suffering                Belief
     

  3.           Surrender                          Letting Go                             Surrender
     

  4.           Moral Inventory                 Eightfold Path                       Righteousness
     

  5.           Confession                        Right Speech                       Purification
     

  6.           Willingness                        Right Intention                     Self-Restraint
     

  7.           Humility                             Right View                           Humility
     

  8.           Forgiveness                      Loving Kindness                 Gratitude
     

  9.           Amends                            Right Concentration            Almsgiving
     

  10.           Daily Examination             Five Precepts                      Repentance
     

  11.           Prayer Meditation              Mindfulness                        Prayer
     

  12.           Service                              Sangha (Community)         Community

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A Buddhist's Non-Theist 12 Steps - These Steps were created by Bodhi, from Sydney, Austrailia. They can be found on Mike H.'s Realistic Recovery website. Bodhi writes that "Buddhism does not teach the doctrine of theism, but rather points out ways to live an enlightened, spiritual life without necessarily believing in God."

 
  1. We admitted our addictive craving over alcohol, and recognized its consequences in our lives.
     

  2. Came to believe that a power other than self could restore us to wholeness.
     

  3. Made a decision to go for refuge to this other power as we understood it.
     

  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
     

  5. Admitted to ourselves and another human being the exact moral nature of our past.
     

  6. Became entirely ready to work at transforming ourselves.
     

  7. With the assistance of others and our own firm resolve, we transformed unskillful aspects of ourselves and cultivated positive ones.
     

  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed.
     

  9. Made direct amends to such people where possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. In addtion, made a conscientious effort to forgive all those who harmed us.
     

  10. Continue to maintain awareness of our actions and motives, and when we acted unskillfully promptly admitted it.
     

  11. Engaged through the practice of meditation to improve our conscious contact with our true selves, and seeking that beyond self. Also used prayer as a means to cultivate positive attitudes and states of mind.
     

  12. Having gained spiritual insight as a result of these steps, we practice these principles in all areas of our lives, and make this message available to others in need of recovery.

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Buddhist 12 Steps - Doug C.'s "A Buddhist's Insight into the 12 Steps of Recovery" was originally posted on the Buddhist Recovery Network. The network supports the use of Buddhist teachings, traditions and practices, in particular mindfulness and meditation, to help people recover from the suffering caused by addictive behaviours.

 
  1. We admitted that we were powerless over our craving and addiction and that our lives have become unmanageable.
     

  2. We came to believe that a Power greater than our individual selves could restore us to wholeness.
     

  3. We made a decision to take refuge in and entrust ourselves to the compassion and guidance of a Greater Power of our understanding.
     

  4. We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of our thoughts, words, and deeds.
     

  5. We admitted to ourselves, our Greater Power, and another human being the precise moral nature of our thoughts, words, and deeds.
     

  6. We became entirely ready to have our Greater Power transform our unwholesome characteristics into wholesome ones.
     

  7. We humbly turned our unwholesome and unskillful qualities over to our Greater Power to be transformed into positive ones.
     

  8. We made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
     

  9. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. We continued to remain mindful of our mental, verbal, and physical actions, and when we acted unskillfully, promptly admitted it.
     

  11. We engaged in meditation and prayer in order to improve our conscious contact with our Greater Power (of our understanding) and to gain the insight and strength to realize and attain our Greater Power's compassionate aspiration for us.
     

  12. Having realized a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps, we carry this message to others in need of recovery, and try to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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Mikey's version- The founder of Our Mostly Agnostic Group Of Drunks shares the steps he used after his "spiritual awakening".

Step 1: I realized how much power alcohol had over me -- that my life had become
             unmanageable.

Step 2: I came to believe that a greater power could restore me to sanity.

Step 3: I made a decision to turn my will and my life over to the care of these steps.

Step 4: I made a searching and fearless moral inventory of myself.

Step 5: In sharing with someone the exact nature of my wrongs, I was able to see
             those character defects from an outside perspective.

Step 6: I became entirely willing to be rid of those wrongs by looking for them in my
            daily life.

Step 7: I did the foot-work to remove these wrongs from my life.

Step 8: I made a list of all the people I've harmed and continue to harm and            
            became willing to right those wrongs.

 

Step 9: I righted those wrongs in any way that was or is possible.

Step 10: I continuted to take personal inventory and when I was wrong, promptly
               righted those wrongs.

Step 11: I sought through awareness and meditation to improve my conscious
               contact with the moments as they come.

Step 12: Having made a profound change in myself and my outlook on life, I tried to
              carry AA's message to the alcoholic and to practice these principles in all my
              affairs.

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Islamic Twelve steps to recovery - There are some 21 Millati Islami groups across the United States who use this adaptation of the Steps. Founded in Baltimore in 1989, the organization tries to "incorporate the Islamic Way of Life with the traditional Twelve Step approach."

 
  1. We admitted that we were neglectful of our higher selves and that our lives have become unmanageable.
     

  2. We came to believe that Allah could and would restore us to sanity.
     

  3. We made a decision to submit our will to the will of Allah.
     

  4. We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
     

  5. We admitted to Allah and to ourselves the exact nature of our wrongs.
     

  6. Asking Allah for right guidance, we became willing and open for change, ready to have Allah remove our defects of character.
     

  7. We humbly ask Allah to remove our shortcomings.
     

  8. We made a list of persons we have harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
     

  9. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. We continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
     

  11. We sought through Salaat (prayer service) and Iqraa (reading and studying) to improve our understanding of Taqwa (God consciousness; proper Love and respect for Allah) and  Ihsan (though we cannot see Allah, he can see us).
     

  12. Having increased our level of Iman (faith) and Taqua, as a result of applying these steps, we carried this message to humanity and began practicing these principles in all our affairs.
     

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Native american 12 steps -This version was prepared for Native Americans by the Umatilla Tribal Alcohol Program and can be found on the Young Warriors Network, a site run by a group dedicated to providing healing services to First Nations and Métis peoples in Canada

 
  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol, that we had lost control of our lives.
     

  2. We came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could help us regain control.
     

  3. We made a decision to ask for help from a Higher Power and others who understand.
     

  4. We stopped and thought about our strengths and our weaknesses and thought about ourselves.
     

  5. We admitted to the Great Spirit, to ourselves and to another person the things we thought were wrong about ourselves.
     

  6. We are ready, with the help of the Great Spirit, to change.
     

  7. We humbly asked a Higher Power and our friends to help us change.
     

  8. We made a list of people who were hurt by our drinking, and want to make up for these hurts.
     

  9. We are making up to those people whenever we can except when to do so would hurt them more.
     

  10. We continue to think about our strengths and weaknesses, and when we are wrong we say we are wrong.
     

  11. We pray and think about ourselves, praying only for strength to do what is right.
     

  12. We try to help other alcoholics and to practice these principles in everything we do.

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a personalized template - Neil F. describes these Steps as "my personal process. It is what I have used to guide my recovery and day to day living." He encourages others to use it or to create their own "from the original template so that you have a process that you are comfortable with and that works for you." He explains his alternative 12 Steps on the AAAgnostica website: Personalizing the 12 Steps.

 
  1. We admitted that we suffer from a seemingly hopeless state of mind and body.
     

  2. Came to believe that we could recover.
     

  3. Became open to changes in how we approach and respond to life.
     

  4. Made a searching and fearless inventory of ourselves. 
     

  5. Reviewed our inventory with another human being.
     

  6. Became entirely open to change. 
     

  7. Humbly affirmed our desire to change.
     

  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became ready to make amends to them all.
     

  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
     

  11. Sought through meditation to improve our understanding of ourselves, our program and our progress.
     

  12. Having changed as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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Gabe's Therapist'S Version - Gabe S. was inspired by his therapist's 12 Steps. These Steps take a psychological approach to the program of recovery from alcoholism, an approach that has been common since the first days of AA.

 
  1. Alcohol was something we could not do with, or without. Our lives and relationships were shattered.
     

  2. We gained hope by talking to others who either have had or understood our problem.
     

  3. We decided to accept what they said and act on their suggestions.
     

  4. We needed to own our behaviour both good and bad.
     

  5. We discussed it with someone else.
     

  6. We identified those personal characteristics which had shaped our lives and accepted that they needed to change.
     

  7. We asked for practical help in effecting these changes.
     

  8. We made a list of those people whose lives had been affected adversely by our actions and behaviour, became prepared to make amends.
     

  9. We repaired the harm we had done to them, whenever possible without doing further harm to ourselves or anyone else.
     

  10. We continued to own our behaviour on a daily basis.
     

  11. We tried to discover our own place in the world and to get in touch with our own personalities.
     

  12. We became prepared to help others follow the same path.

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The Twelve step journal- From The Twelve Step Journal, a workbook designed for all in recovery regardless of belief or lack of belief, by Claudette Wassil-Grimm. Copyright ©1996 by Claudette Wassil-Grimm. Published in 1996 by the Overlook Press, New York, NY. All rights reserved.

 
  1. We admitted we were powerless over our addiction/compulsion — that our lives had become unmanageable.
     

  2. We came to believe that, like all human beings, our power was limited and we needed to learn to let go and learn from others.
     

  3. We made a decision to let go of control, assume a spirit of goodwill, seek the wisdom of responsible others, and discover our true "voice within."
     

  4. We made a searching and fearless inventory of our strengths and weaknesses.
     

  5. We admitted to our journal, ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
     

  6. Were entirely ready to listen to wise counsel and seek that still small voice within to guide us to change our behaviors which have been harmful to ourselves and others.
     

  7. Humbly began the process of deep change so we could overcome our weaknesses.
     

  8. Made a list of all persons we have harmed and became willing to make amends to them all, and to forgive those against whom we have held grudges.
     

  9. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
     

  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it. 
     

  11. Through meditation and journaling we continually seek to clarify and improve our own judgement and to consider the best direction and purpose our lives can take.
     

  12. Having developed deeper wisdom and an appreciation of the spiritual as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other addicts and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

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The Twelve Steps of self-confirmation- These alternative 12 Steps are taken from Alcoholics Anonymous and the Counseling Profession: Philosophies in Conflict, an article Christine Le, Erik P. Ingvarson, and Richard C Page. It was first published in the July / August 1995 issue of The Journal of Counseling & Development

 
  1. I realize I am not in control of my use.
     

  2. I acknowledge that a spiritual awakening can help me to find a new direction.
     

  3. I am ready to follow and stay true to the new path I have chosen.
     

  4. I have the strength and courage to look within and to face whatever obstacles hinder my continued personal and spiritual development.
     

  5. I commit to become fully aware of how my use hurt the people around me.
     

  6. I am changing my life and developing my human potential.
     

  7. I am proud of my strength and ability to grow.
     

  8. I will do all I can to make up for the ways I have hurt myself and others.
     

  9. I will take direct action to help others in any way that I can
     

  10. I will strive to be self-aware and follow the new path I have chosen.
     

  11. I will continue to develop my potential through helping others and strive to become fully conscious of myself and life around me.
     

  12. I will continue to develop my own human potential and spirituality and will actively help others who cannot control their use of alcohol.

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Fitting in with traditional AA by erica k.- This version of the Steps are from a popular podcast from AABeyondBelief.com.

 
  1. Admitted we were powerless over alcohol and recognized the consequences of drinking in our lives.

  2. Came to believe and to accept that we needed strengths beyond our awareness and resources to restore us to wholeness.

  3. Made a decision to entrust our lives to the care of ourselves and the collective wisdom of those who have struggled with the same problem.

  4. Made an honest and thorough inventory of our thoughts, behaviors, and emotions.

  5. Admitted to ourselves and to another person the exact nature of the unskillful aspects of our thinking and behavior as well as the goodness within ourselves.

  6. Became willing to let go of our behaviors and personality traits that are injurious to ourselves and others.

  7. With the assistance of others and our own firm resolve, we transformed unskillful aspects of ourselves and cultivated positive ones.

  8. Made a list of all people we have harmed, including ourselves, and became willing to make amends to them all.

  9. Made direct amends to all people we have harmed, including ourselves, and made an effort to forgive those who have harmed us.

  10. Continued to maintain awareness of our thoughts and behaviors and when we acted unskillfully promptly admitted it.

  11. Sought through mindfulness and meditation to improve our awareness of ourselves and the world around us, seeking only for knowledge of our path in life and the power to carry that out.

  12. Having had a profound change in ourselves and our lives as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs. 

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Alan's 12 fucking steps- This version of the Steps are thrown in here at the bottom to see if anyone was really paying attention. They are here for amusement purposes only, but you may actually get something out of them. Here goes...

Step 1: I’m fucked.


Step 2: There might be a way out of this fucking mess.


Step 3: Decide to level the fuck up.


Step 4: Take a good hard look at how fucked up I am.


Step 5: Tell someone else about all the fucked up stuff I’ve been through.


Step 6: Prepare to stop being such a fuck up.


Step 7: Try to stop acting so fucked up.


Step 8: Make a list of everyone I fucked over.


Step 9: Swallow my fucking pride and tell them I really fucked up, except when doing                so would fuck them harder.


Step 10: Keep an eye on my fucked up thinking and behavior.


Step 11: Chill the fuck out sometimes.


Step 12: Help the next poor fucker that walks through the door.

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